Just Born: A New Beer for Riverkeeper. Name It!

The Peekskill Brewery. Photo by fredamoon.
Peekskill Brewery menu; photo by fredamoon. All links ours.

Glad tidings from the Greenburgh Daily Voice: “Peekskill Brewery and Captain Lawrence Brewing Co. are collaborating in brewing a new beer to benefit Riverkeeper. The harvest ale to be brewed at the Peekskill Brewery will be available to the public at the 2014 Hudson Hop and Harvest festival taking place Oct. 4 from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Peekskill Riverfront Green Park….

Proceeds from the sale of the harvest ale will benefit Riverkeeper’s work to protect the Hudson River and the drinking water supply for 9 million New Yorkers, according to a press release.

Admission to the festival is free.

Riverkeeper needs volunteers to help run the compost station at the festival. Volunteers will receive a T-shirt, food, beverages and more. For more information, contact Jeremy Cherson at outreach@riverkeeper.org.

The Riverkeeper staff also is seeking help from consumers to name the harvest ale. To suggest a name, click here.

The Ultimate Peekskill Rock: The 1992 Meteorite

From Wikipedia, knower of all things known:

The Peekskill meteorite is among the most historic meteorite events on record.[1] Sixteen separate video recordings document the meteorite burning through the Earth’s atmosphere, whereupon it struck a parked car in Peekskill, New York.[2] Peekskill is an H6 monomict breccia;[3] its filigreed texture is the result of the shocking and heating following the impact of two asteroids in outer space.[4] The meteorite is of the stony variety and approximately 20% of its mass is tiny flakes of nickel-iron.[5] When it struck Earth, the meteorite weighed 26 pounds (12 kg) and measured one foot in diameter. The Peekskill meteorite is estimated to be 4.4 billion years old.[6] The meteorite fell on October 9, 1992 – an event witnessed by thousands across the East Coast.

The meteorite fell on October 9, 1992 – an event witnessed by thousands across the East Coast. Numerous residents of PittsburghPhiladelphia and Washington D.C. described the “huge greenish fireball.”[7] The meteorite broke up over Kentucky and passed over West Virginia and Pennsylvania on its north-northeast trajectory before striking a parked 1980 red Chevy Malibu [see photo below] at approximately 7:50 pm EDT. After traveling through space at a cosmic velocity of 8.8 miles per second, the speed of the meteorite at impact had slowed to 164 miles per hour.[8]

Read more. And keep your head up.

Peekskill meteorite

Take it away, Wikipedia: “Eighteen-year old Michelle Knapp, the car’s owner, heard the collision from inside her home. She later described the sound as “like a three-car crash”. Hurrying outside to investigate the noise, Knapp found her car smashed and the 26-pound meteorite, still warm and smelling of sulfur, beneath it.” Photo of Knapp and her meteored Chevy Malibu  by John Bortle.